The Far North Regional Museum was established in 1969 with the purpose of collecting and preserving treasures and taonga relating to the history of the Far North.

In 1985, archives became an important part of the museum and over the past 25 years have become a comprehensive asset.

Our Far North history, in New Zealand terms, begins very early with the arrival of the French explorer de Surville in Doubtless Bay in 1769. Thirty years later, whaling ships were dropping anchor in Mangonui Harbour. The settlement of an Anglican Mission Station in 1834 and a thriving industry of kauri timber spars, flax and kauri gum all contributed to a robust community.

In 2006, the concept of bringing all Far North District Council amenities under one roof was envisaged. The new community centre, named Te Ahu, was completed in 2011 -incorporating the i-Site Visitor Centre, Library, Cinema, Café, Auditorium, Council Service Centre and Te Ahu Heritage Museum.

The museum and archives are administered under the guidance of the Far North Regional Museum Trust and staffed by a full time curator/manager and a part-time archivist.

Current trustees are:

  • Bronwyn Bauer-Hunt (Chair)
  • David Senior (Deputy Chair)
  • Sean Stratton (Treasurer)
  • Awhina Murupaenga (Secretary and Te Hiku Community Board representative)
  • B.J. Natanahira (Te Runanga o Te Rarawa representative)
  • David Russell
  • Russell Shackleton
  • Sarah Wale

What's in a name?

Over the years our Museum has been known by many different names which has become confusing. In February 2018, these three names were chosen by the Far North Regional Museum Trustees but they wanted the public to choose the final name:

  • Te Ahu Heritage Museum
  • Museum @ TeAhu (or Museum at Te Ahu)
  • Far North Regional Museum

Voting for preferred name was placed as a 'Comment' on our Facebook page or dropped in a box at the entrance to the Museum in Te Ahu.

Voting closed on 8 March 2018 and the name 'Museum @ Te Ahu' was chosen.

Opening Hours


  • Monday to Friday -
    8.30am to 5:00pm


  • Thursday & Friday -
    9.00am to 4.00pm

Te Ahu